Information

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The Eastern Kingbird is a large flycatcher. Adults are grey-black on the upperparts with light underparts; they have a long black tail with a white end and long pointed wings. They have a red patch on their crown, seldom seen. They are 25 cm long, 40 cm across the wings and weighing 60 gms.

Their breeding habitat is open areas across North America. They make a sturdy cup nest in a tree or shrub, sometimes on top of a stump or pole. These birds aggressively defend their territory, even against much larger birds. These birds migrate in flocks to South America. They wait on an open perch and fly out to catch insects in flight, sometimes hovering to pick food off vegetation. They also eat berries and fruit, mainly in their wintering areas.

Eastern Kingbird place their nests in the open and they hide nests very well. They nest in open fields; in shrubs over open water; high in tall trees and even in the tops of small stumps. Both male and female participate in nest defense.

They can also recognize and remove cowbird eggs from their nests. Still, Blue Jays, American Crows, Squirrels and Tree-climbing Snakes are occasion nest predators. American Kestrel are probable predators of adults.

Photos

Eastern Kingbird, White Rock Creek Greenbelt
Eastern Kingbird, White Rock Creek Greenbelt
Eastern Kingbird, White Rock Creek Greenbelt

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